Camp Kita is a week-long summer camp program open to children ages 8-17 who are survivors of a loved one's suicide.

 Camp Kita was established in 2013 by the Mosher siblings, many years after losing their father to suicide. Camp Kita offers a balance of traditional camp activities - cabins, canoes, campfires and fun - with support sessions aimed to connect, learn, talk about being a suicide survivor and process grief as a community with professional facilitators and the Mosher siblings as adult role models. 

Through diligent fundraising and generous, enthusiastic supporters, we are able to offer our grief support program free of charge

Support Camp Kita and warm up for the Boston Marathon with The Thin Blue Line 5K.  Proceeds go in part to the camp, and it is a great cause! Hurry up because it is happening Oct. 24th.


Looking forward to 2016! Please click the button above to get more information.
In the United States, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death.* 50%
Claiming an average of 102 lives each day.* 100%

These statistics represent the thousands of friends, siblings, mentors, and parents who choose to end their lives; leaving behind an average of 6* intimately affected people with intense feelings of grief.
* based on the Center for Disease Control (CDC) Suicide Data Sheet, 2012.

Every dollar given helps us remain TUITION FREE! Thank you for your support






Provide a safe, constant environment for young survivors of suicide, by giving direction through common interests, activities and grief management. 


Provide a safe, nurturing environment where child survivors can connect with one another while learning constructive ways to deal with the often unspeakable and fierce emotion of losing a loved one to suicide.  By creating a space for child survivors, we effectively ease the stigma around what it means to have lost a someone to suicide.  The campers’ shared loss and experience affords them the opportunity of forming deep, knowing bonds with others and thereby forging supportive connections that we hope will last a lifetime.  As a community of survivors, our week-long focus will be to provide and explore constructive forms of self-expression.  We will practice self-awareness as a way of identifying feelings and communicating them in a focused way.  Our focus on grief—on shattering apart—will dovetail with an equally important focus on hope—the power and purpose of piecing oneself together.  Most importantly, we will empower campers to utilize the tools and resources we provide so that they may draw upon them throughout their lives.

Nyaruani, Age 11

Camp Kita was so much fun, it taught me to be a strong fighter and not let this define who I am. I want to go every year and help other children as I grow up. I would encourage any kids who dealt with suicide to go to this camp, you will love it and be glad you did it. I know it’s hard!

Becca, Age 17

My first year at Camp Kita exceeded my expectations. I had no idea what to expect and I was honestly nervous. However, it was an experience that changed my life. I went with my 13 year old brother Billy and I myself am 17. I thought maybe I would be too old and feel out of place, but I fit right in. Meeting Isaiah, Morgan and Sydney was so amazing. They know exactly what I am going through and the environment they created was so welcoming and understanding. We all had that connection of having lost a parent to suicide. The camp itself had both elements of learning to cope with grief which included talking about our losses and also the fun parts! We had an amazing time on the ropes taking the leap of faith, canoeing, swimming and hiking (which was fun despite when I stepped on a wasps nest). All of the elements of camp were fun and the environment was so comforting. I felt so at peace because normally you aren’t surrounded by so many people that know exactly how you feel. Rarely do you run into people who have been through the same loss. I am so thankful for having the opportunity to go to this camp and I can’t wait for next year! — Becca, Age 17

SanSan, Age 13

Camp was not a place where they make you share your feelings, it is a choice. The staff were great as they listened and didn’t try to say they knew how you felt. When I was at camp I felt like we were all the same and like one BIG family. They Taught me that I am a survivor an not different because I only have one parent.
Q. How do I donate?
A. You can donate in our 'Take Action" section, or near the top of the page. If preferred, checks can be written out to “Camp Kita” and sent to PO Box 238, North Berwick, Maine 03906.
Q. How do I sign up to volunteer?
A. If you are interested in volunteering your time with Camp Kita, we would love to hear from you! Please contact us directly and let us know how you would like to be involved.
Q. How do I set up my own fundraiser on behalf of Camp Kita?
A. We would love your support! Contact us and let us know your plans for how you would like to be involved.
Q. When is the camp scheduled in 2015?
A. August 16 – 22, 2015.
Q. How much does camp cost?
A. Through diligent fundraising and generous, enthusiastic supporters, we are able to offer our program free of charge.

Camp Kita was established Mosher siblings as a camp where child suicide survivors could connect as a community of support. The Moshers, Sydney, Morgan and Isaiah, lost their father to suicide in 2003 when they were teenagers. At the time, each sibling dealt with the loss on their own, avoiding speaking as a family about his death and even pretending it hadn’t been suicide. As adults they confessed to each other how lonely they felt at the time knowing the truth and not knowing any other suicide survivors they could talk to about it all. Each sibling had thought that they were all alone in their grief and the isolation increased their sense of grief. As adults they can guess that there probably were other families around them grieving a suicide but they just didn’t know it and they didn’t know how to connect. The siblings all expressed a hope that no child has to endure isolation along with suicide grief like they did. This hope led to an idea to create a camp where child survivors can connect in a positive and healing way to create a lasting community of support and true understanding. And with that, Camp Kita was born

The Moshers

Kim has experience providing mental health treatment to both adults and children as a licensed clinical professional counselor in the state of Maine. She formerly worked as an elementary school clinician specializing in play and art therapy techniques. For the past 6 years she has worked as a crisis clinician specializing in suicide risk assessment, prevention and recovery. She developed an interest in supporting suicide survivors through her work with families in the crisis setting and through having a family member who is a suicide survivor.


Nichole has spent the last five years experiencing the world anew for a second and third time through the beautiful blues of her sons’ eyes. Having brought forth two innocent and curious children into the world, Nichole realizes the importance of all of our children and has spent her time at home working diligently on a variety of causes in hopes of inspiring social change through awareness. She holds a Master’s in English Literature from the University of New Hampshire, and—in addition to her work with Camp Kita—enjoys writing and creating.


Maggie is a clinical psychologist who has built a career working with children and adolescents in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, schools, and the court system. In her work, she has witnessed the challenges that come with trauma and loss and has developed expertise in helping individuals navigate the sometimes difficult process of grieving. Now an outpatient provider in Cambridge, MA, Maggie is excited for the opportunity to bring her skills to Camp Kita! When she's not at work, Maggie can often be found spending time with her husband, watching documentaries on Netflix, curled up with a good book and a cup of tea, or riding her bike around Boston. She also loves cheering on the Red Sox!


Melanie grew up in Portland and spent time studying in New Orleans ad Connecticut before returning to Maine to complete her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology at the University of Maine at Farmington. The focus of her degree is on counseling psychology which she has utilized working closely with children and families at multiple social service nonprofits in Southern Maine for the past 4 years. She also holds a certificate in Grant Writing and is pursuing a certificate in Fundraising from the University of Southern Maine, and spends much of her time volunteering with other human service oriented nonprofits. When she isn’t working or volunteering Melanie can often be found exploring the outdoors with her boyfriend and their old, mischievous dog, Jester. She recently became aware of Camp Kita and is extremely excited to share her skill set in order to further the mission and impact of Camp Kita.




Cassandra Mosher- Camp Support Judy Doran- Camp Nurse Mary Emerson- Camp Chef Martha Gallagher- Camp Support Suzanne Glidden- Camp Accountant Smiles 4 Shelly